Rights Respecting

We are a Rights Respecting Level 2 School.
The Convention on the Rights of the Child Article 29 of the UNCRC underlines our vision as a school. 
 
We are the proud holders of the UNICEF level 2 Rights Respecting Award for Schools.

Unicef is the world’s leading organisation working for children and their rights.

The Rights Respecting Schools Award is granted to schools that show commitment to promoting and realising children’s rights and encouraging adults, children and young people to respect the rights of others in school.

The Level 2 Award is the highest accolade given by Unicef UK and shows a deep and thorough commitment to children’s rights at all levels of school life. There are over 230 schools across England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales that have received the Level 2 Award.

We are absolutely delighted to receive the Level 2 award as it recognises all of the dedication of our school community in ensuring that a children’s rights approach is at the heart of our school curriculum and ethos. I am extremely proud of our achievement and would like to say thank you to everyone who has been involved in our journey

The Award recognises achievement in putting the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child at the heart of a school’s planning, policies and practice. A Rights Respecting School is a community where children’s rights are learned, taught, practised, respected, protected and promoted. Unicef UK Rights Respecting Schools Adviser for the South West, said: “Severnbanks Primary School is the first school in Gloucestershire to be awarded Unicef UK’s Rights Respecting Schools Award Level 2 which is a great achievement! We would like to thank the children and adults for their hard work and look forward to working with them to help more people know about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child so that all children can have the best possible childhood.”

The Unicef UK Rights Respecting Schools initiative now involves over 3,600 primary and secondary schools in the UK who have reported a positive impact on pupil behaviour, relationships and well-being by enhancing pupil’s self-esteem, leading to less truancy and bullying, better learning and improved academic standards.

The Unicef UK Rights Respecting Schools initiative now involves over 3,600 primary and secondary schools in the UK who have reported a positive impact on pupil behaviour, relationships and well-being by enhancing pupil’s self-esteem, leading to less truancy and bullying, better learning and improved academic standards.

How does teaching about children's rights fit in with the aims of the school?

The aim of both Rights Respect Responsibilities and the school is to help children in achieving their potential and become responsible citizens. What is taught in our curriculum helps children learn respect for self, others, critical thinking skills, and informed decision-making.

How can parents support what children are learning about the Convention at school?

The aim of both Rights Respect Responsibilities and the school is to help children in achieving their potential and become responsible citizens. What is taught in our curriculum helps children learn respect for self, others, critical thinking skills, and informed decision-making.

Take the time to ask your child what he/she has learned recently regarding children’s rights.

Discuss the ideas learned in class, and try to think of examples from your own experiences, or from the media, of rights being respected or denied.

Discuss how your child or your family can promote respect for rights, or help those whose rights have been violated.

Ask your child’s opinion on children’s rights.

As with most things, the learning of rights, respect, and responsibility begins at home. Children often learn what they see and hear. By becoming involved in your child’s learning and showing an interest in who he/she is and what he/she is doing, you help your child to learn the importance of giving and sharing with others.